The Thames Walk Perfect For Summer Sundays

Cameras at the ready! This easy stroll is full of snap-worthy spots.

There’s nothing more exciting than England in the summer. Barring the stuffy tube rides and pasty bods (not that I can judge!), everyone seems just that bit happier to be out.

But whether you’re going for a post-work run or are planning bevvies and a picnic in the park, every green space seems to fill up and fast.

This leafy stretch along the Thames offers a quieter afternoon out, and if you’re hoping to tourist, there’s plenty of things to see as well.

1. Hammersmith Bridge and the start of the walk

A good portion of London has years worth of history behind it and the Hammersmith Bridge is no different.

The Grade II-listed site has survived multiple terrorist attacks since the 1930s and, with the ever-increasing London traffic, has often undergone structural repairs to support the extra weight of cars, trucks and buses.

History aside, this is also a great spot to begin your day. It’s an easy 10 minute walk from Hammersmith station, and you can even pick up a Boris bike along the way if you fancy!

Heading left at the bridge, you’ll come across a lively hotspot of riverside restaurants, the Fulham Reach Boat Club (hello, rowing lads!) and sun-soaked punters relaxing by the Thames.

2. The Thames Path and Bishops Park

Passing The Blue Boat and Brasserie Blanc restaurants, you’ll now have a lovely 20 minute walk (or 10 minute cycle) by the river towards Bishops Park.

There are a few more eateries along the way and plenty of relaxed vibes to enjoy. Couple that with the sounds of seagulls and it almost feels like you’re by the beach!

As you reach the end of the visible path, head left alongside Craven Cottage, Fulham’s football stadium, and make sure you check out the absurdly small doors – it honestly looks like only a small child could fit through until you’re right up close!

Up the path and back onto the road, continue for two minutes until you hit the park on your right – this is the very edge of Bishops Park.

You’ll then want to mosey on down to the Thames for the promised leafy walk.

With the river on one side and a lush park on the other, it’s one of two great picnic spots in the area and the ultimate way to escape from the hustle of the city.

3. The Rose Garden and Fulham’s All Saints Church

After your picnic, or if you just want to keep walking, follow the path along until you hit the rose gardens and, behind them, the church.

With meandering trails through the adjacent cemetery and blooming flowers in between, you’ll get lost in your own imagination and tales of the past.

4. Fulham Palace and The Walled Garden

Once you’ve finished exploring the churchyard, it’s time to head to Fulham Palace, though that’s a bit of a generous term to describe the building hidden behind Bishops Park…

The building was once home to the bishops of London but today serves as a museum and art gallery which you can visit from 12.30pm – 4.30pm.

The Palace grounds is our second recommendation for a place to picnic and is also home to a stunning but small secret garden – well worth a wander through!

At the time of writing, the only available entrance is via Bishop’s Ave due to restoration work around the palace. Exit from here, too, and it’s about a half a hour walk to Hammersmith station or ten minutes to the Putney Bridge Undergound.

As new locals, we’ve already completed this walk plenty of times and have found the prettiest times are when the Thames is at high tide. You can check that out before your visit here.

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